i aim my arrows high















hilariousclinton:

 Rosies of Color. Happy International Women’s Day. 

2 days ago with 38404 notes — via allegrocantabile, © hilariousclinton
#feminism #social justice #obv not still women's day BUT a good reblog



3 days ago with 16 notes — via amatsuki
#social justice #stem #feminism



mymindsecho:geobytes:morbidmira:veganmovement2012:





Genetically engineered

^This is a shitty thing to do. You’re just going to make minimum wage workers have to spend all day peeling off stickers and make lower-class people who can’t afford non-gmo food afraid to buy food.

My favorite thing about this though is the QR code on the sticker.
Hamburger Helper and its generic versions are often go-to meal plans for lower income households. I know we sure ate the hell out of it growing up, back when my family was really struggling financially.
My family isn’t struggling so much these days, but still, we have nothing that could scan a QR code. We don’t have pocket devices with instant internet access. So how the hell is anyone financially worse off than us supposed to make use of this code and website?
This isn’t helping anyone. This isn’t educating anyone. This is just scaring people with limited options and giving more work to people who aren’t paid enough. This is bullshit.


Those kind of things piss me off so bad. Not just for the reasons listed above, but because it’s insulting to a lot of peoples intelligence.
Do they think a lot of people don’t realize that stuff is shit? Do they think a lot of mothers don’t place it in their carts with the mentality of, ‘at least the family will eat tonight’.
There are thousands of people in the world who would love to eat healthy. To buy fresh produce and make healthy meals for their families.
But until they make the cost of healthy eating comparable to low income eating - back the fuck off your high horse about the food people choose when looking at having to put SOMETHING on the table.

mymindsecho:geobytes:morbidmira:veganmovement2012:

Genetically engineered

^This is a shitty thing to do. You’re just going to make minimum wage workers have to spend all day peeling off stickers and make lower-class people who can’t afford non-gmo food afraid to buy food.

My favorite thing about this though is the QR code on the sticker.

Hamburger Helper and its generic versions are often go-to meal plans for lower income households. I know we sure ate the hell out of it growing up, back when my family was really struggling financially.

My family isn’t struggling so much these days, but still, we have nothing that could scan a QR code. We don’t have pocket devices with instant internet access. So how the hell is anyone financially worse off than us supposed to make use of this code and website?

This isn’t helping anyone. This isn’t educating anyone. This is just scaring people with limited options and giving more work to people who aren’t paid enough. This is bullshit.

Those kind of things piss me off so bad. Not just for the reasons listed above, but because it’s insulting to a lot of peoples intelligence.

Do they think a lot of people don’t realize that stuff is shit? Do they think a lot of mothers don’t place it in their carts with the mentality of, ‘at least the family will eat tonight’.

There are thousands of people in the world who would love to eat healthy. To buy fresh produce and make healthy meals for their families.

But until they make the cost of healthy eating comparable to low income eating - back the fuck off your high horse about the food people choose when looking at having to put SOMETHING on the table.

4 days ago with 4187 notes — via geleixi, © labelityourself
#food #social justice #economics



"

Contrary to how it’s usually depicted in Western media, Taiwan is not just a “city” or “small island”. By population Taiwan is larger than Australia. Consider what that means. Imagine that two-hundred student activists seized Australia’s Parliament House in Canberra and refused to leave, the standoff continuing for weeks. And that Australians in support of the students flooded the capital in protest of the prime minister. Would CNN be able to afford a camera on the ground? Would other networks send someone?

More important than population, however, or at least what should be important from a Western perspective: Taiwan is a vibrant multiparty democracy built by a culture that is largely Chinese. This is unique in the world. And this democracy is now under siege.

"
— “Why the American media blackout on Taiwan?” (x)
4 days ago with 60 notes — via amatsuki
#social justice #media awareness #current events



sevenpoints:rectumofglory:catbotherer:fegeleh:ashkenazi-autie:hckleinman:ashkenazi-autie:

I’m scared of what would happen after they register…

I googled it. Multiple news sources are covering this. This is actually happening. This is terrifying.

My first thought is that this would lead to something bigger. I don’t know if it would be on the scale of the Holocaust, but registering of Jews was an early part of it.

i want to reblog this 1000000000000099999 times im fucking flipping my fucking shit here

after kansas city shooting i fucking like didnt sleep and now this and i feel like fucking harry potter when theyre all like figuring out voldemorts coming back “it feels like it did before…HE’S back”

except antisemitism never left, it never disappeared

i duno how to handle this fear and these fucking horrible feelings and the fear and anxiety and

fucking no no no no no 

this is so terrifying what the fuck ugh

Just to clarify:

Donetsk is a city in Ukraine where pro-Russian militants have seized control and…are doing a lot of terrifying shit.

1 week ago with 1567 notes — via fille-lioncelle, © rknjl
#well this is terrifying #antisemitism #current events #social justice



projectunbreakable:

nine photographs portraying quotes said to sexual assault survivors by police officers, attorneys, and other authority figures

more info about project unbreakable here

original tumblr here

previously: nine photographs portraying quotes said to sexual assault survivors by their friends/family

1 week ago with 247159 notes — via the-sentimentalist, © projectunbreakable
#rape culture #social justice #rape tw



This is why I fucks with you Yvette. (x)

For extra win, here’s her response to random disgruntled white woman #52:

 “It’s 2014, not 1960 get over it already.”  -#52

“What horrible price are white people currently paying Melissa Hammersley? Are their wages or chance of career advancement affected? Do their children lack opportunities? Is it impossible for them to get a fair trial or equal jail time for the same crime? What has been SO hard for white people since Slavery times that black folks should allow them the right to use the N-word freely? I’m baffled. 

I’m sorry you, in particular, are struggling so hard with the idea that its use is NEVER acceptable by caucasians in particular but I have now completely tired of your contributions on this topic on MY page. Feel free to continue raging against the unjust treatment of blacks towards whites and the “get over it-ness” of it all on YOUR page. God bless.”  - Yvette

1 week ago with 21493 notes — via smashsurvey, © wifigirl2080
#yvette nicole brown #racism #social justice #culture work



eridayumampora:

youngmarxist:

So if we have to show women what the baby looks like in their womb and tell them how the process works before allowing them to get an abortion, does that mean we should teach our soldiers about the culture of the lands we’re invading, and explain to them that the people we want them to kill have families and feel pain, just like Americans?

Maybe we should actually be teaching that to the politicians who send them there in the first place.

1 week ago with 89164 notes — via perquisitesofinfamy, © youngmarxist
#abortion tw #social justice



"

What constitutes “chilling” behavior? A teacher calls on the boys in class more than the girls. A CEO ignores what a woman says in a meeting but listens intently when a man makes the exact same point. A conference emcee mentions a female speaker’s appearance rather than (or in addition to) her accomplishments, but feels no need to comment on the appearance of male speakers. A guy at an atheist/skeptics meeting hits on a young woman in an elevator at 4 AM, ignoring the fact that she just spent the evening talking about how she hates being objectified at such gatherings.

All these sorts of things seem tiny and insignificant by themselves, but they add up, and this produces a cumulative “chilling” effect that makes women feel unwelcome, like they don’t belong. That’s a “chilly climate.” The effect is subtle; sometimes we’re not even consciously aware of it. We just have that nagging feeling of being “less than,” unable to put our finger on why we feel that way.

"
1 week ago with 3163 notes — via newwavefeminism, © amelie-anomaly
#feminism #social justice



jnenifre:


From Facebook

After spending years developing a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, Arunachalam Muruganantham has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family. Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected — contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?” As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention. Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty — everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school. To read more about Muruganantham’s story, the BBC featured a recent profile on him at http://bbc.in/1i8tebG or watch his TED talk at http://bit.ly/1n594l6. You can also view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/To learn more about the 2013 documentary Menstrual Man about Muruganantham, visit http://www.menstrualman.com/For resources to help girls prepare for and understand their periods - including several first period kits - visit our post on: “That Time of the Month: Teaching Your Mighty Girl about Her Menstrual Cycle” at www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=3281To help your tween understand the changes she’s experiencing both physically and emotionally during puberty, check out the books recommended in our post on “Talking with Tweens and Teens About Their Bodies” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=2229And, if you’re looking for ways to encourage your children to become the next engineering and technology innovators, visit A Mighty Girl’s STEM toy section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math

jnenifre:

From Facebook

After spending years developing a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, Arunachalam Muruganantham has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. 

Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family. 

Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected — contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. 

Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”

After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?” 

As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”

In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention. 

Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty — everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school. 

To read more about Muruganantham’s story, the BBC featured a recent profile on him at http://bbc.in/1i8tebG or watch his TED talk at http://bit.ly/1n594l6. You can also view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/

To learn more about the 2013 documentary Menstrual Man about Muruganantham, visit http://www.menstrualman.com/

For resources to help girls prepare for and understand their periods - including several first period kits - visit our post on: “That Time of the Month: Teaching Your Mighty Girl about Her Menstrual Cycle” at www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=3281

To help your tween understand the changes she’s experiencing both physically and emotionally during puberty, check out the books recommended in our post on “Talking with Tweens and Teens About Their Bodies” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=2229

And, if you’re looking for ways to encourage your children to become the next engineering and technology innovators, visit A Mighty Girl’s STEM toy section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math

1 week ago with 54075 notes — via amatsuki, © jnenifre
#social justice #medical equality #feminism #economics



"Not being able to wear leggings because it’s ‘too distracting for boys’ is giving us the impression we should be guilty for what guys do."

Sophie Hasty, age 13

Responding to her middle school’s ban on shorts, leggings and yoga pants for girls.

(via elledeau)

I’m glad to see these young girls are standing up for their rights and calling the school out on sexism.

(via bookoisseur)

1 week ago with 37925 notes — via gloryandus, © thinkprogress.org
#culture work #social justice #rape culture #feminism #protect teenage girls at all costs



"I remember in school one time, I had a teacher who was talking about abstinence, and she said, ‘Imagine you’re a stick of gum. When you engage in sex, that’s like getting chewed. And if you do that lots of times, you’re going to become an old piece of gum, and who is going to want you after that?’ Well, that’s terrible. No one should ever say that. But for me, I thought, ‘I’m that chewed-up piece of gum.’ Nobody re-chews a piece of gum. You throw it away. And that’s how easy it is to feel you no longer have worth. Your life no longer has value."

Elizabeth Smart Says Pro-Abstinence Sex Ed Harms Victims of Rape

And Elizabeth Smart knocks it so far out of the park, she put a dent in the ISS.

(via mohandasgandhi)

2 weeks ago with 2385 notes — via baronesskika, © kalimehndi
#rape culture #sex education #social justice #elizabeth smart



"

Just last week, a 7th grader with a curvy build came home upset about this. She had worn an outfit with a skirt and leggings, and in the morning, a teacher had said to her, “Cute outfit.” But then her homeroom teacher pulled her aside at the end of the day and said, “You know, another girl could get away with that outfit, but you should not be wearing that. I’m going to dress code you.” Juliet Bond and the child’s mom were discussing the incident, not certain if the message to the child was ‘you’re too sexy’ or ‘you’re too fat.’

The kids also report that the teachers have been discussing ‘appropriate body types for leggings and yoga pants and inappropriate body types for yoga pants and leggings.’

Bond says, “This is concerning because it is both slut shaming and fat shaming. If a girl is heavy or developed, the message is that she cannot wear certain clothes.” Neither is acceptable. We should not be sexualizing kids, nor should we be making them feel that they can wear leggings as long as they remain stick thin. Bond asks, “Why are the girls being pulled out of class to have assemblies on whether they are wearing the right clothes, while the boys remain in class, learning and studying?”

I don’t have a problem with a school having a dress code; in fact, I attended a school that didn’t allow jeans or shorts or shirts without collars, but I do have a problem when the dress code is discriminately based on gender and body type. There is a big difference between telling all students to dress respectfully and telling curvy girls to dress in a way that doesn’t distract boys.

"
2 weeks ago with 50824 notes — via rurone, © becauseiamawoman
#rape culture #fatshaming #social justice #feminism #educational equality



2 weeks ago with 2 notes , © feministing.com
#social justice #media responsibility #social awareness #feminism



"I want the US government to stop killing people in countries around the world. I want it to stop terrorizing populations. I want it to stop incinerating children. I want it to stop using war to give corporations money and Americans a false sense of security. I want it to stop creating anti-American violence in the name of fighting it."

"Bloodless Liberals" by David Mizner

Every week or so, I return to this essay. It makes the point that the Deleuze quote I posted a few days ago was making: human rights are nothing in and of themselves; we must create the situation for them to have meaning and that’s much more difficult than waving around human rights law to stop violations.

(via commiefemme)

3 weeks ago with 77 notes — via cheeseburjer, © fearandwar
#social justice #politics