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August 2014
28
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ladiesagainsthumanity:

As a diehard sportsfan, I am continually frustrated by professional sports’ willingness to tolerate violence against women as nothing more than “an unfortunate situation” among athletes. This excellent piece in Deadspin by staceymayfowles examines the issue of rape culture in Major League Baseball from a survivor’s point of view — well worth a read. (trigger warning)

ladiesagainsthumanity:

As a diehard sportsfan, I am continually frustrated by professional sports’ willingness to tolerate violence against women as nothing more than “an unfortunate situation” among athletes. This excellent piece in Deadspin by staceymayfowles examines the issue of rape culture in Major League Baseball from a survivor’s point of view — well worth a read. (trigger warning)

August 2014
27
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maarnayeri:

Let us be vividly clear about this.

What the New York Times did to Michael Brown today was not merely slander. It wasn’t a case of a lack of journalistic integrity.

Highlighting that a black teenager was “no angel” on the day he is being laid to rest after being hunted and killed by racist vigilante forces is not an unfortunate coincidence.

The New York Times deliberately played into an archaic American tradition in devaluing both the value of black life and the tragedy of black death.

They chose the day of his funeral, as his family, friends and activists everywhere have to grapple with a human being lost to pontificate about how he was “no angel”. Michael Brown was many things to many people; a son, a brother, a cousin, a nephew and another black causality of murderous police institutions and today, amidst all the racist violence he, his loved ones and community have had to endure, he was going to finally receive the respect and moment of honor he deserved and NYT decided today, of all days, to tune in their audience onto wholly irrelevant facts about his life - that in turn, transform the very injustice surrounding his death and the following police violence that plagued Ferguson into a national panel about whether or not his death is actually worth mourning and their language suggested that to them, it indeed is not.

This was hardly an accident or mistake. This is the perpetual hostility that is met against black life in America. The consensus is that black people deserve no respect and for black life to be legitimized and honored, we must meet a list of prerequisites. Subsequently, if black people aren’t valued, neither are our deaths understood as tragic or murders seen as criminal action.

This has been the atmosphere of America since its inception and much has not improved.

August 2014
26
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cactesse:thesoftghetto:

Protesters upset about the smearing of Mike Brown converged at CNN headquarters.

people complain sooo much about social media and “twitter activism” completely ignoring that without social media the only way anyone would know whats going on is through media controlled by straight, white, capitalist men

August 2014
26
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geekerrific:cyberteeth:

Chimamamda Ngozi Adiche, We Should All Be Feminists

The most powerful thing anyone has ever said to me: “You deserve to take up space.” 

August 2014
26
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humansofnewyork:

"We don’t like pictures like this. It is not good to deduce an entire country to the image of a person reaching out for food. It is not good for people to see us like this, and it is not good for us to see ourselves like this. This gives us no dignity. We don’t want to be shown as a country of people waiting for someone to bring us food. Congo has an incredible amount of farmland. An incredible amount of resources. Yes, we have a lot of problems. But food is not what we are reaching for. We need investment. We need the means to develop ourselves." 
(Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo)

humansofnewyork:

"We don’t like pictures like this. It is not good to deduce an entire country to the image of a person reaching out for food. It is not good for people to see us like this, and it is not good for us to see ourselves like this. This gives us no dignity. We don’t want to be shown as a country of people waiting for someone to bring us food. Congo has an incredible amount of farmland. An incredible amount of resources. Yes, we have a lot of problems. But food is not what we are reaching for. We need investment. We need the means to develop ourselves." 

(Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo)

August 2014
26
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Four Hundred Sociologists Demand Justice and Change in Policing of Communities of Color 

August 2014
25
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fauxcyborg:

i am not sympathetic to abusers who are frightened of themselves or are just shocked, just shocked, at what they did.

and by not sympathetic i mean i don’t believe them, think they’re manipulative and using rhetoric to take the blame off themselves. 

August 2014
24
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hawkeytime:

I think, at the root of this whole “women aren’t real sports fans” debate is the idea that it isn’t acceptable for women to sexualize men even though, for centuries, women have been reduced to objects.

Too often women are written off as only enjoying a sport for the eyecandy. First of all, during a hockey game, there is no eyecandy - literally every inch of the players’ bodies are covered. Honestly, the players look like block rectangles with legs and a helmet. Wow, so hot. Also - female and male hockey players are indistinguishable in pads but for the occasional ponytail. There really isn’t anything sexually appealing about a hockey game to a heterosexual woman - other than the hockey porn, of course. We don’t sit on the edges of our seats through 60+ minutes of play to ogle the players. We do it because we love the game - for the excitement, the thrill, the beauty of it.

But even if a woman is in it for the eyecandy, for the ass and abs, she has every right to be a fan of the sport for that reason, among others. Turn on your TV and watch a few commercials. What do you see? Women in tight, short skirts. Women with plunging necklines. Women engaging in blatantly sexual acts until they themselves are the product, not the things they’re selling. Are men sexualized in the same way? Very rarely. The vast majority of society sees no problem in the sexualization of women because “it’s the way things have always been.” While that is, in of itself, deeply problematic, it’s a phenomena in our society that we can’t deny.

So why is it, that the moment men are sexualized, there is this outcry, this dismissal of the women doing the sexualization? People don’t point fingers at men at Lingerie Football League games and say, “You’re not a true football fan!” Men who go to Powderpuff Football Games just to leer at the women aren’t crucified. Male fans of beach volleyball aren’t called into question. Why? Because that has become the status quo, because somehow, in some deeply twisted way, men are permitted to see women as sexual objects, but women aren’t allowed the same right.

What, a woman who can appreciate the physical attributes of an athlete isn’t a “true sports fan?” That woman can’t know the game inside out, can’t play it better than you, can’t crunch numbers and spit out facts? Women are smart, women are strong, and women are also sexual beings. We can find athletes sexy if we want to. We have every right to sexualize men as long as they continue to sexualize us. And if that doesn’t make men lesser people, then why is it grounds to dismiss a female fan?

At the root of this debate is an issue of inequality, of the repression of female sexuality. And in order to solve a problem, you must always start at the root.

August 2014
23
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a-kinky-virgin:z-x-y:

Six in 10 girls quit activities they love because of how they feel about their looks

Sorry that this isn’t Architecture related, but this is a serious issue. I can tell you from a personal point of view that I actually quit hockey when I was younger because of my self esteem issues. Girls and boys all around the world find a sport they love, but have it cut short because they do not like the way they look. 

Girls and boys need their coaches, parents, friends etc. to help them through this. They need to be told that they should focus on their love for whatever sport it is instead of feeling bad about the way they look. 

Pass this on, and let people know that everybody has a chance to be who they want to be without thinking about the way they look. 

I quit ballet because of this. Even as a little girl, I didn’t like that my thighs were bigger than the other girls.

And I was not a chubby kid.

August 2014
23
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wilsoncenter:

What do Rwanda, Afghanistan, and Iraq beat America at? Having women in congress/parliament
Countries with better representation of women in government than the United States (hat tip to our Women in Public Service Project):
Rwanda - 56%
Andorra - 50%
Cuba - 45%
Sweden - 45%
Seychelles - 44%
Senegal - 43%
Finland - 43%
South Africa - 42%
Nicaragua - 40%
Iceland - 40%
Norway - 40%
Mozambique - 39%
Denmark - 39%
Netherlands - 39%
Costa Rica - 39%
Timor-Leste - 39%
Belgium - 38%
Argentina - 37%
Mexico - 37%
Tanzania - 36%
Spain - 36%
Uganda - 35%
Angola - 34%
Serbia - 33%
Nepal - 33%
Germany - 33%
Macedonia - 33%
Ecuador - 32%
Slovenia - 32%
New Zealand - 32%
Algeria - 32%
Guyana - 31%
Burundi - 31%
Switzerland - 29%
Portugal - 29%
Trinidad and Tobago - 29%
Austria - 28%
Ethiopia - 28%
Afghanistan - 28%
France - 27%
Lesotho - 27%
Tunisia - 27%
Belarus - 27%
South Sudan - 27%
El Salvador - 26%
Bolivia - 25%
Iraq - 25%
Laos - 25%
Canada - 25%
Australia - 25%
Sudan - 25%
Lithuania - 25%
Vietnam - 24%
Namibia - 24%
Kazakhstan - 24%
Singapore - 24%
Liechtenstein - 24%
Croatia - 24%
Poland - 24%
Kyrgyzstan - 23%
Latvia - 23%
Bulgaria - 23%
Philippines - 23%
Pakistan - 23%
United Kingdom - 23%
Malawi - 22%
Mauritania - 22%
Czech Republic - 22%
Eritrea - 22%
Uzbekistan - 22%
Luxembourg - 22%
Peru - 22%
Italy - 21%
Boznia and Herzegovina - 21%
China - 21%
Greece - 21%
Cape Verde - 21%
Estonia - 21%
Dominican Republic - 21%
Cambodia - 20%
Israel - 20%
Moldova - 20%
Bangladesh - 20%
Honduras - 20%
Monaco - 19%
Tajikistan - 19%
Mauritius - 19%
Slovak Republic - 19%
Indonesia - 19%
Sao Tome and Principe - 18%
United States - 18%
(source: World Bank)

wilsoncenter:

What do Rwanda, Afghanistan, and Iraq beat America at? Having women in congress/parliament

Countries with better representation of women in government than the United States (hat tip to our Women in Public Service Project):

  1. Rwanda - 56%
  2. Andorra - 50%
  3. Cuba - 45%
  4. Sweden - 45%
  5. Seychelles - 44%
  6. Senegal - 43%
  7. Finland - 43%
  8. South Africa - 42%
  9. Nicaragua - 40%
  10. Iceland - 40%
  11. Norway - 40%
  12. Mozambique - 39%
  13. Denmark - 39%
  14. Netherlands - 39%
  15. Costa Rica - 39%
  16. Timor-Leste - 39%
  17. Belgium - 38%
  18. Argentina - 37%
  19. Mexico - 37%
  20. Tanzania - 36%
  21. Spain - 36%
  22. Uganda - 35%
  23. Angola - 34%
  24. Serbia - 33%
  25. Nepal - 33%
  26. Germany - 33%
  27. Macedonia - 33%
  28. Ecuador - 32%
  29. Slovenia - 32%
  30. New Zealand - 32%
  31. Algeria - 32%
  32. Guyana - 31%
  33. Burundi - 31%
  34. Switzerland - 29%
  35. Portugal - 29%
  36. Trinidad and Tobago - 29%
  37. Austria - 28%
  38. Ethiopia - 28%
  39. Afghanistan - 28%
  40. France - 27%
  41. Lesotho - 27%
  42. Tunisia - 27%
  43. Belarus - 27%
  44. South Sudan - 27%
  45. El Salvador - 26%
  46. Bolivia - 25%
  47. Iraq - 25%
  48. Laos - 25%
  49. Canada - 25%
  50. Australia - 25%
  51. Sudan - 25%
  52. Lithuania - 25%
  53. Vietnam - 24%
  54. Namibia - 24%
  55. Kazakhstan - 24%
  56. Singapore - 24%
  57. Liechtenstein - 24%
  58. Croatia - 24%
  59. Poland - 24%
  60. Kyrgyzstan - 23%
  61. Latvia - 23%
  62. Bulgaria - 23%
  63. Philippines - 23%
  64. Pakistan - 23%
  65. United Kingdom - 23%
  66. Malawi - 22%
  67. Mauritania - 22%
  68. Czech Republic - 22%
  69. Eritrea - 22%
  70. Uzbekistan - 22%
  71. Luxembourg - 22%
  72. Peru - 22%
  73. Italy - 21%
  74. Boznia and Herzegovina - 21%
  75. China - 21%
  76. Greece - 21%
  77. Cape Verde - 21%
  78. Estonia - 21%
  79. Dominican Republic - 21%
  80. Cambodia - 20%
  81. Israel - 20%
  82. Moldova - 20%
  83. Bangladesh - 20%
  84. Honduras - 20%
  85. Monaco - 19%
  86. Tajikistan - 19%
  87. Mauritius - 19%
  88. Slovak Republic - 19%
  89. Indonesia - 19%
  90. Sao Tome and Principe - 18%
  91. United States - 18%

(source: World Bank)

August 2014
23
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“never again”
This image is one of the most powerful pro-choice images I’ve ever seen. When I saw it in the newspaper I immediately cut it out and hung it on my wall.
This is not my image. I’m using it with permission from Arthur Newspaper.

“never again”

This image is one of the most powerful pro-choice images I’ve ever seen. When I saw it in the newspaper I immediately cut it out and hung it on my wall.

This is not my image. I’m using it with permission from Arthur Newspaper.

August 2014
22
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Most mass murderers do not go from zero to 60. Rodger made escalating assaults on women (splashing coffee on them, attempting to shove them off a ledge) before his killing spree. Both Cho and Justin-Jinich’s murderer harassed women before they killed anyone. When such acts go unnoticed and unpunished — because we expect men to harass women, and it’s not outrageous or even noteworthy when they do — they can become stepping-stones to more conspicuous and less socially acceptable acts of violence.

 -

Raina Lipsitz

Interesting to note that while a history of animal cruelty is widely accepted to be a link with becoming a serial killer, the link between cruelty towards women and killing women is still up for debate. If a guy abuses a cat and then shoots women we say "we should have seen it coming that guy was nuts", but if abuses women and then shoots women we say "we had no way of seeing it coming that guy was a perfectly polite, kind and wonderful human 

(via marxisforbros)

August 2014
21
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saintkieren:

Some of the most striking, war zone-like, almost hellish looking images from the ongoing peaceful protests in Ferguson, Missouri over the murder of unarmed teenager Michael Brown.

August 2014
16
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ghostofscrooge:

Senator Nasheed has started a petition to Appoint a Special Prosecutor to Investigate the Murder of Michael Brown the county prosecutor, Bob McCulloch, has demonstrated police sympathies and the people do not trust him to adequately process this case to achieve justice. PLEASE SIGN 

August 2014
16
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jackviolet:

The cop who shot a dog in front of its 6 year old owner was fired after outrage from the community and a “Justice for Apollo” campaign.

The cop who shot an unarmed black teen is on paid leave and remains protected by his department. So far, days of outrage and protest have still not brought any justice to Mike Brown.

In America, in 2014, the life of a black man is valued less than that of a dog.

Literally.