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September 2014
01
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thebicker:mediamattersforamerica:


A Fox News panel discussing the ‘war on women’ features four men and no women.

This, in one image, is the essence of the problem with the war on women. Four straight white guys “debating” how women aren’t oppressed. Fox News isn’t even trying.

thebicker:mediamattersforamerica:

A Fox News panel discussing the ‘war on women’ features four men and no women.

This, in one image, is the essence of the problem with the war on women. Four straight white guys “debating” how women aren’t oppressed. Fox News isn’t even trying.

August 2014
29
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prettyboystyles:

and if you look to your left, you’ll see yet another example of how male celebrities can get away with having nudes leaked without any damage to their reputation or career :)))

August 2014
27

Few things in life are truer than this: No one is less likely to be trustworthy or rational than a self-identified older person who deploys a phrase like “society has raised a bunch of entitled young adults.” Similarly, there is no one more entitled in the universe than someone who would build a whole letter to the editor around such a blinkered view of young people and then expect others to read it with anything other than scorn, contempt, and slight regard.

August 2014
25
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godinthebrokenness:

Plenty of films have taken a stab at bringing Bible stories to life, from “The Ten Commandments” and “Jesus Christ: Superstar” to this year’s “Son of God” and “Noah.” But despite those movies’ different genres and tones, these films all tend to share one similarity: They have white casts, even though the Bible’s characters would have been from parts of Africa or the Middle East. Photographer James C. Lewis of Noire3000 | N3K Photo Studios has decided to rectify by presenting these iconic figures in a new light.

Lewis’ “Icons Of The Bible” photo series depicts some of the most famous characters from the Old and New Testament exclusively as people of color, including Simon Peter, Elijah, King Solomon and the archangel Gabriel. The series, which will be fully released in October, features 70 models who identify as either Asian, Native American, Hispanic, African, Middle Eastern, Black American and West Indian.

"I think it is very important to see one’s self in the Scripture so that it may become real in their eyes," Lewis told The Huffington Post. "The whitewashing of the Bible has always bothered me. However I’m happy to now have the opportunity to give a different point of view."

(Article)

August 2014
17
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medievalpoc:beggars-opera:

I’ve seen a few fashion posts trying to expand the “Marie Antoinette is not Victorian” rant, but this stuff can get complicated, so here is a semi-comprehensive list so everyone knows exactly when all of these eras were.

Please note that this is very basic and that there are sometimes subcategories (especially in the 17th century, Jacobean, Restoration, etc)

And people wonder WHY I complain about History/Art History periodization. Note how much overlap there is to the above “eras”, and how many exceptions and extensions there are to these categories.

Oh, and by the way…

Tudor:

image

Elizabethan:

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Stuart:

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Georgian:

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Regency:

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Victorian:

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Edwardian:

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Because you wouldn’t want to be historically inaccurate.

August 2014
16
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If anything, in fact, it does nothing but highlight how out-of-touch some of these magazines are becoming when they express surprise that the large and energetic fandom of One Direction — a fandom whose stronghold is really Tumblr, a platform that also has a healthy reputation for identity politics talk about feminism, racism, and the rest of it — is, well, large and energetic. There’s a lot of sturm und drang about the “meanness” of the Internet, a topic mostly of interest to older journalists. They’re a population that until the Internet came up simply didn’t get attacked except by other journalists, letters sections being for jokes and cranks. That a world beyond them exists is a problem they’re increasingly having to confront. And there’s a way to do it better than more hackneyed, shitty, sexist tropes, guys.

August 2014
14
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saxas:

People love watching and reading about dystopias and rebellions, but when it happens in real life suddenly those people are demonizing the resistance and championing the oppressors as the protectors of society. 

August 2014
13
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lostthehat:lecinematheque:

Pumzi - dir. Wanuri Kahiu // Kenya

In a dystopian future 35 years after an ecological WWIII  has torn the world apart, East African survivors of the devastation remain locked away in contained communities, but a young woman in possession of a germinating seed struggles against the governing council to bring the plant to Earth’s ruined surface.

The complete short film is on youtube and it’s really good and the end kind of took my breath away. 

August 2014
12
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feelknower1993:

mediamattersforamerica:

How Fox host Todd Starnes reacts to Obama’s offering condolences to shooting victim Michael Brown’s family on Tuesday.

August 2014
12
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malindalo:

From today on Twitter: I often see “I wish [bestselling writer] would include POC/LGBT characters!” But There are other writers who do this. Support them.

malindalo:

From today on Twitter: I often see “I wish [bestselling writer] would include POC/LGBT characters!” But There are other writers who do this. Support them.

August 2014
08
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monumentoursetlist asked

I work at my university's bookstore and every semester one of the professors teaches 'Fight Club' and it's so exciting to see boxes of it come in and rather disappointed to see people return their rented copied or sell them back. Once I returned a copy and the student wrote the synopsis of each chapter under the heading and I freaked out. My manager said it was in otherwise fine condition so we couldn't charge her but what spoilers. How do you feel about your work being taught ?

dashconballpit:

chuckpalahniuk:

That fact that ‘Fight Club’ is being taught seems — to me — to underscore the dearth of novels that explore male issues.  The past years have given us so many books, from ‘The Color Purple’ to ‘The Joy Luck Club’ to ‘How to Make an American Quilt,’ which depict women in groups and relationship, but almost no books depicting social models for men.  That’s my two cents worth.

image

August 2014
06
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I believe that Collins’ construction of Rue as the symbol of innocence meant that some readers automatically imagined her as White. After all, in what universe is an older Black tween innocent? Certainly not in American schools, with the often noted discipline gap. Certainly not in contemporary children’s literature, where Black kids and teens are underrepresented… and when they do appear, are sometimes viewed as “unlikeable” or “unrelatable.”

Collins also makes the grave mistake of stating from Katniss’ point of view that Rue reminds her of her younger sister, Prim. Prim is a much more familiar figure in children’s literature — the guileless, golden girl child often is the counterweight that balances the evil that the protagonist must overcome, and The Hunger Games is no exception. What is different is that while trapped in the Game, Rue becomes Katniss’ Prim, a younger companion who shares in the existential threat until she is overcome by it.

This was too much for some readers to take.

August 2014
05
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What’s it like to work alongside so many other women of color?

July 2014
30
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asheathes:

I still don’t understand why YA is a genre that’s so looked down upon like why is it trendy to hate all things YA? What is it about the genre that makes it so much worse than every other genre? What is it about this genre, despite having produced some of the most popular and successful franchises and have encouraged young people to read again, that causes it to be abhorred by everyone else?

It’s written largely by women and consumed largely by women and teenage girls. 

That is why it’s hated. See exhibit JG: when men write YA, it’s deemed by mainstream publications/periodicals/bloggers/etc. as “the YA that isn’t worthless.” 

When men deign to talk about YA, it’s “beginning” a conversation about it… even though it’s been discussed by women and girls for decades.

When school librarians, booksellers, and teachers are buying for the classroom and/or recommending to parents and students, they’re more likely to recommend books that had critical appeal — which makes sense.  But what about the fact that critics are more likely to receive for review, and then favorably review, books by male authors or about male characters than woman authors or characters? What happens then? 

When people realized in the mainstream that more YA is written by/for/about girls than boys, people fretted WHAT ABOUT THE BOYS? WHAT WILL THEY READ IF NO BOY CHARACTERS? even though girls have been made to read, and empathize with, and indoctrinate into ourselves as Real Literature, books with male protagonists (or only male characters) basically since Gutenberg, not to mention Salinger. 

Speaking of Salinger, Catcher In The Rye is generally lauded as the YA that “started it all” when Maureen Daly’s “Seventeenth Summer” a) came first and b) fits the category more cohesively.  When people want to canonize a book as The First, they look to the one written by a man (and about a boy protag) before considering its predecessors.

e.lockhart and John Green both published their first YA books in 2005… and yet recently, lockhart was called a “protege” of Green’s “mastery” of the category.

It isn’t just that YA lit is hated, it’s the audience who reads it, the core demographic who writes it, and the characters it represents that are hated — or at the least, demeaned.  Trying to address the issue of “why is this category mocked and demonized” without taking that step to question why its values and function and the people who make the category are REALLY the ones being mocked and demonized can’t solve the problem.  Or, really, attack it at all. 

The solution isn’t to “write better books” or “have more mature book jackets” or “hope that the mockery is a trend” or “ignore the big franchises for the literary standouts” or whatever else.  Those are just other ways to sweep under the rug the fact that the literary community is still hugely misogynistic, and that’s what needs to change before category (or genre) distinctions can even matter.

July 2014
18
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I don’t mind. I think there’s a prevalent, arrogant opinion in rock music, where people assume that the kids don’t know shit. And I think I’d rather be playing to 14-year-olds who aren’t jaded and whose record collections don’t exist to impress their friends. It’s this adult idea of guilty pleasures. ‘Oh I like this, but I don’t want anyone to know that I do,’ which is so pretentious. I don’t believe in that. There is something honest about the fact that the kids like your band, and that’s a great reward for us. There is no pretense.

 -

Patrick Stump on how he responds to critics who say Fall Out Boy is a band that only 14-year-olds can like in an interview with The Aquarian published on December 27, 2006

(via noacejustyou)