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July 2014
18
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I don’t mind. I think there’s a prevalent, arrogant opinion in rock music, where people assume that the kids don’t know shit. And I think I’d rather be playing to 14-year-olds who aren’t jaded and whose record collections don’t exist to impress their friends. It’s this adult idea of guilty pleasures. ‘Oh I like this, but I don’t want anyone to know that I do,’ which is so pretentious. I don’t believe in that. There is something honest about the fact that the kids like your band, and that’s a great reward for us. There is no pretense.

 -

Patrick Stump on how he responds to critics who say Fall Out Boy is a band that only 14-year-olds can like in an interview with The Aquarian published on December 27, 2006

(via noacejustyou)

July 2014
05
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medievalpoc:

travelwedo replied to your photo: “Fiction Week! The Girl Who Spun Gold by Virginia Hamilton,…”:
Isn’t this basically Rumplestiltskin? Why is this Virginia Hamilton credited as the author? How is this different from plagiarism?

This is literally the weirdest objection I’ve ever heard.

Of course it’s Rumpelstiltskin. So are the 1,154 results you get for “Rumpelstiltskin” on Amazon.com, the 181 results you get on Goodreads, the 65 results on Powell’s books, and the literally thousands of short stories, retellings, novels for kids, teens and adult, TV shows, movies, animated films, and endless other adaptations of this basic tale type.

Sometimes the story is called “Straw into Gold”, “The Miller’s Daughter”, “Hoppetînken”,”Tarandandò”, “Tom Tit Tot”, and/or Folktale Type 500: Name of the Helper.

Virginia Hamilton is credited as the author because she wrote the text. For the same reason Paul O. Zelinky is credited as the author for this book:

image

As Liesl Shurtliff is the author of this book:

image

As Vivian Vande Veld is the author of this book:

image

And so, Virginia Hamilton is the author of this book:

image

^ None of these are even remotely related to plagiarism.

So…why the outrage over this particular illustrated children’s adaptation?

July 2014
04

A teenage girl falls in love and chooses to have sex with her boyfriend. They break up and she moves on. A story so common and simple and yet Forever is one of the most challenged books of the 20th century. [x]

A teenage girl falls in love and chooses to have sex with her boyfriend. They break up and she moves on. A story so common and simple and yet Forever is one of the most challenged books of the 20th century. [x]

July 2014
02
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iwgregorio:

Here in America in the 21st century, we live in an infuriatingly post-everything world, where racist people know they can’t be seen as racist, where anti-women activists know they can’t be seen as anti-women, and homophobes know they can’t be seen as homophobic. So we lace our words, our actions, our laws with different, thinly veiled excuses. Laws that target black men are instead interpretations of the Second Amendment that permit us to “stand our ground.” Women’s health and safety is put at stake in order to stand by freedom of speech and religion, as long as the religion is Christianity. And to finish off the triumvirate, lesbian books for children are banned not for being about lesbians, but because they include a few curse words.

The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily Danforth, published in 2012, was a YA tour de force, a book that older queers wished had been written when they were kids, lauded by numerous high-brow publications for the quality of its writing. It was also nominated for the much-coveted Morris Award, given by the American Library Association each year to the best new voice in YA. This wasn’t just a book that the gays were reading. Everybody was reading it! And loving it!

Then it was banned for “inappropriate language.”

@afterellen is working with a Delaware bookstore, Browseabout Books, to try to get the word out about the CAMERON POST banning.  Anyone can call the store at (302) 226-2665 and order a copy of the book to be given to an interested area reader.

July 2014
02
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The 2014 Nebulas Have Been Awarded, And All Of The Fiction Winners Are Women 

medievalpoc:

Winners:

  • Novel: Ancillary Justice, Ann Leckie
  • Novella:  The Weight of the Sunrise,’’ Vylar Kaftan
  • Novelette:  ‘‘The Waiting Stars,’’ Aliette de Bodard
  • Short Story:  ‘‘If You Were a Dinosaur, My Love,’’ Rachel Swirsky
  • Ray Bradbury Award for Outstanding Dramatic Presentation: Gravity
  • Andre Norton Award for Young Adult Science Fiction and Fantasy Book: Sister Mine, Nalo Hopkinson
  • Kevin O’Donnell Jr. Service to SFWA Award: Michael Armstrong
  • 2013 Damon Knight Grand Master Award: Samuel R. Delany

You can read a lot of the winning and nominated works linked in the article.

June 2014
30
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femmefandom:

Kate and Kaya’s Super Fun Little White Lies Analysis

After analyzing the results of our survey, we found a lot of participants had issues with this song, and so we decided to take a closer look.

(Song lyrics in bold are from Little White Lies by One Direction. Italicized song lyrics are from Blurred Lines by Robin Dicke Thicke.)

June 2014
28
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thecrustychicano:mitsurugireiji:fasteronfire525:xbeatrce:




It’s important that people see this

I dont even know who this is, but the media pulls shit like this often and it should be publicized.

mark duggan was the young man shot to death by the met police here in london, and whose murder, now ruled controversially as ‘legal’, sparked the summer riots a few years back.

that photo crop is the scummiest thing ever

thecrustychicano:mitsurugireiji:fasteronfire525:xbeatrce:

It’s important that people see this

I dont even know who this is, but the media pulls shit like this often and it should be publicized.

mark duggan was the young man shot to death by the met police here in london, and whose murder, now ruled controversially as ‘legal’, sparked the summer riots a few years back.

that photo crop is the scummiest thing ever

June 2014
25
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It’s lovely that Robin Thicke thinks his marriage is worth saving, but this is not the way to go about it. This entire album, the track names, the hashtag; if this is in fact a sincere effort to “get her back” it’s basically a how-to on abuser dynamics. Rather than allowing Patton the time and space to decide whether or not to reconcile in private, with this album, Thicke has effectively enlisted the public to get on his side and pressure her into going back to him, and make her the villain if she refuses. “Oh, but he wrote a whole album about her! He’s really sorry!” All while he rakes in the cash, and she loses her resolve to stay away from a man who cheated on her, publicly embarrassed her and ruined a decades long relationship.

June 2014
19
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mindythings:

what’s the point of being a fan if you’re not a critical one? what’s the point of absorbing media without the intention of analyzing it? i don’t understand why some people wholeheartedly defend their faves’ flaws and shortcomings, when pointing out and not supporting your faves’ problematic aspects DOES NOT MAKE YOU ANY LESS OF A FAN BUT MAKES YOU AN ENGAGED AND AWARE CONSUMER

June 2014
18
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And while we’re on the subject, I’d like to say a few words about escapism. I hear the term bandied about as if it’s a bad thing. As if “escapist” fiction is a cheap opiate used by the muddled and the foolish and the deluded, and the only fiction that is worthy, for adults or for children, is mimetic fiction, mirroring the worst of the world the reader finds herself in.

If you were trapped in an impossible situation, in an unpleasant place, with people who meant you ill, and someone offered you a temporary escape, why wouldn’t you take it? And escapist fiction is just that: fiction that opens a door, shows the sunlight outside, gives you a place to go where you are in control, are with people you want to be with(and books are real places, make no mistake about that); and more importantly, during your escape, books can also give you knowledge about the world and your predicament, give you weapons, give you armour: real things you can take back into your prison. Skills and knowledge and tools you can use to escape for real.

As JRR Tolkien reminded us, the only people who inveigh against escape are jailers.

 - Neil Gaiman, from theguardian.com (via thensiur)
June 2014
18
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We cannot find any basis in statute or case law for extending a copyright beyond its expiration. When a story falls into the public domain, story elements—including characters covered by the expired copyright—become fair game for follow-on authors.
More important, extending copyright protection is a two- edged sword from the standpoint of inducing creativity, as it would reduce the incentive of subsequent authors to create derivative works (such as new versions of popular fictional characters like Holmes and Watson) by shrinking the public domain.
[If a work enters the public domain on a date stemming from first creation not final improvement the original creator may not be inclined to “improve” the work but later] other artists will have a greater incentive to improve it, or to create other works inspired by it, because they won’t have to pay a license fee to do so provided that the copyright on the original work has expired.

 -

7th Circuit Judge Richard Posner

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/thr-esq/conan-doyle-estate-loses-appeal-712135

In other words, the 7th circuit affirmed last December’s ruling that all but the last 10 Holmes stories are now in the public domain, in a ruling that criticizes long copyright terms and praises transformative works. The dicta would be beneficial to inspired secondary creators in cases involving transformative works.

(via fyeahcopyright)

June 2014
18
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Seven Female YA Authors Who Are Also Worthy Of The Attention John Green Gets

biffreads:

1. Rainbow Rowell- Rainbow Rowell has written two heartbreakingly beautiful YA stories in the past few years, Eleanor & Park and Fangirl. Both are realistic, relevant, and romantic. Rowell does lead female characters like no one else and makes romantic interests, much more than just the typical “romantic interest”. She is also just a ridiculously talented writer. 

2. E. Lockhart- Not only has she written a beautiful new YA novel, We Were Liars, she also has a great series: the Ruby Oliver boyfriend series, that deals with the stress of being a teenager and the issue of slut shaming. Her writing style is completely different in We Were Liars than it is from the Ruby Oliver series, but both are delicious reads. 

3. Meg Cabot- Okay, okay, I know Meg Ccabot probably got as much recognition as John Green in her prime, but still. I love her. Her writing style actually sounds like a teenage girl’s and her realistic, blunt, and witty portrayals of adolescence have gotten me through some tough times. They’re classic escape novels with just enough bite in them to elevate them above the rest. 

4. Gayle Forman- I want everybody to jump on the Gayle Forman train. Her stories involve both romance and family relationships. If I Stay is a haunting account of a young girl trying to decide between life without her family or the afterlife. It takes the cliche idea of a person stuck between life and death and makes it something really refreshing. Just One Day and Just One Year were two of my favorite books that I read last year. While they’re a little less heavier than If I Stay, they are still inspiring and entertaining stories of heartbreak and recovery. 

5. Melina Marchetta- If you like YA and haven’t read Melina Marchetta, you are soooooo missing out my friend. Seriously, she is a crazy talented writer who writes YA novels that make me laugh and cry and break in to a million pieces. The Piper’s Son? I died. Jellicoe Road? Oh my lord. These may seem like great books to read at the beach but I promise you Marchetta’s characters will get to you and you will think about them long after you’re down reading. 

6. Ann Brashares- I’m not gonna lie, sometimes, I’m a little embarrassed to admit The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants is one of my favorite books. Everyone just always has to mention the mediocre movie. “But the books are good!” And they are and I love them. I read them every year at the beginning of summer and something about them just puts me in such a good frame of my mind for summer. The girls are relatable, strong, flawed, and everything a teenage girl is and should be. 

7. Stephanie Perkins- Her books are so adorable, seriously. They’re great romances. The guy is always admirable, respectable, but still seems like a real person. The girl is always a little dramatic, but still much more mature and self-aware than the average YA heroine. Her books are entertaining and an escapist’s dream. 

June 2014
17
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June 2014
16

Anonymous asked

Would you be able to (or have you already) explain why iggy azalea is so problematic? I know tumblr doesn't like her but the only reason I see them using is because she is a white rapper but I thought you would be able to expand and explain it properly?