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July 2014
23
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When I attended CatalystCon this spring, I received a lot of advice from older female sex writers, many of whom encouraged me to be careful as I started my career. I was just too young to understand the ramifications of my decisions, one woman in her early 50s stressed. I did not want to brand myself with a scarlet letter this early in the game. Her advice, while well intentioned, scared the shit out of me. But then I actually thought about the undercurrent of what she had said. It was a maternally protective gesture marked by fear: others will judge you for writing what you write, and you need to anticipate that.


Well I don’t want to anticipate that. I don’t want to accommodate a culture that will slut-shame me for writing thought-provoking, eloquent, and yes, sexy fiction and nonfiction. If my solid resume of clips and internships with gender and sexuality oriented publishing houses means I will not get a job I am fully qualified for in the future, fuck that.One of the central reasons I write feminist erotica is to change the culture, not to jack it off while comfortably existing within its patriarchal hang ups.

July 2014
19
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  • Glamour UK: What do you get riled up about in a feminist context?
  • Gillian Anderson: A lot. I have feminist bones and when I hear things or see people react to women in certain ways I have very little tolerance.
  • Glamour UK: But don't you feel sorry for modern men? Not knowing whether they should help us with our bags and open doors for us or whether we'll see it as an affront?
  • Gillian Anderson: No. I don't feel sorry for men.
#feminism   
July 2014
18
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princelesscomic:

*Zuri and I listen to the radio*
Zuri - Did you hear daddy? They said equal rights for women.
Me - I did hear that.
Zuri - I’m a woman.
Me - Yes you are. Do you want equal rights?
Zuri - Yep.
Me - Then you’re a feminist.
Zuri - I’m a feminist! I will tell mommy when we get home.
Me - I think she’ll be happy to hear that.

Gotta teach your kids the “F” word young, before they learn it from somebody that doesn’t know how to use it.

#feminism   
July 2014
15
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It is illegal for women to go topless in most cities, yet you can buy a magazine of a woman without her top on at any 7-11 store. So, you can sell breasts, but you cannot wear breasts, in America.

 -

Violet Rose (via c-icatrix)

This is one of my favorite quotes about sexualization/objectification vs autonomy of female bodies bc it’s so succinct

(via platonicsbeforeerotics)

July 2014
14
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There was some controversy about our outfits and how we were dressed and stuff on the Boss music video, which…I don’t know, I think part of the whole—part of the whole stand that we’re making with this thing that we’re calling women empowerment is the fact that, you know, this society has a lot to say on what makes a woman—what should make a woman feel good, and what doesn’t look good, and what does look good, and…they think that they have a right to tell us as women what should make us feel confident in our own bodies. And whether that is, you know, being covered up and wearing a long sleeve sweater, or showing a body part that maybe you would like to show off, at the end of the day, we’re the only ones that are entitled to our bodies, and you’re allowed to wear whatever makes you feel good and whatever makes you feel confident. And that made us feel confident in the video. We’re not encouraging for anyone to dress like that or to dress in a certain way, we’re encouraging all women to dress how they would like to dress and how they would like in order to feel confident and in order to feel good, because at the end of the day we’re the only ones that should be making that call. And whether or not somebody sexualizes you for wearing an outfit, that’s their problem and not yours, I think. And, yeah, I think there’s this whole movement dedicated to that now: the feminist movement of women wearing what they want to wear for them and not for anybody else. And whatever your judgment is on that, it’s not up to you. Girls, we gotta stand firm on that. So, I don’t know, that’s just—that’s what we believe.

 - Camila Cabello, proving at 17 years old she’s more aware than the majority of people with decades on her [x] (via 5horbust)
July 2014
14
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electrikmoonlight:the-privateer:wackiness-ensues:

#YESALLWOMEN

wasn’t this the episode where he dressed up as a woman on a bet because he thought women were overreacting?

This show was progressive beyond it’s years

July 2014
12
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dinotrash:

it is really telling that when guys find out that a lot of women have sexual assault/rape experiences they think that the majority of them are LYING rather than thinking oh this is a huge issue that effects a large portion of women and makes a large group of men predators whoa

July 2014
10
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#feminism   #rape culture   #fire tw   #alcohol tw   #food tw   #nsfr   
July 2014
10
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whoneedsfeminism:

I need feminism because “Who hired a stripper” shouldn’t be the first thing said to me when I walk into a welding job.

whoneedsfeminism:

I need feminism because “Who hired a stripper” shouldn’t be the first thing said to me when I walk into a welding job.

#feminism   
July 2014
07
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thoughtsofablackgirl:

Girls&WomenToKnow: Leanna Archer

Meet Lenna Archer, who started her Leanna Inc. a haircare line at This Long 9 years old. Leanna all nautral organic hair products has generated over $ $100,000 in revenue. Leana develops and mixes each of her products (the original hair dressing was based on a family formula), and tracks orders and customer correspondence. Her parents and two brothers assist in bookkeeping, packaging, and product testing. The company sells its shampoos, conditioners, shea butter, and other products both in stores and online. 

Leanna is a philanthropist as well in 2008 she founded the Leanna Archer Education Foundation, an organization devoted to providing better opportunities for children in Haiti. Leanna’s goal is to built schools in Haiti, while providing a Safe learning environment for over 150 students.

Leanna as been featured in Forbes Magazine, Success Magazine, INC Magazine (30 under 30) and Ebony Magazine. Online web portal, AOL Black Voices, was also impressed with Leanna and positioned the Teen CEO as #5 on their list of “ Top 9 Young Lions” who are making Black History. Leanna has also been interviewed by several major media outlets, including NBC, MSNBC,ABC,FOX Business and BET.

July 2014
04
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mycatsneezeslikealot asked

if men and women should have equal rights then why are you against men wanting rights? feminism isn't about women being better then men is it?...

fuckyeahcourtneystodden:

im against men complaining about wanting ‘mens rights’ because it’s never about wanting anything other than to silence and talk over women.

if men’s rights activists worked to open crisis centers for male victims of abuse and survivors of sexual violence i would love that. if men’s rights activists worked toward support and parenting classes and education for single fathers that would be amazing. if men’s rights activists worked toward educating fellow men on practicing safe sex and consent i would be so on board. if men’s rights activists worked toward breaking down the chains of racism of their brothers of colour i would be so happy. if men’s rights activists advocated for anything of value i would be so down for it all.

instead men’s rights activists sit on the fucking internet talking over women and attempting to silence them and their oppression with arbitrary add-ons, bullshit about the friendzone, and useless fucking nonsense.

so no. i have zero use for men’s rights activists because it’s never about advocating for things men need and instead it’s always about making sure women shut up about what they need. they aren’t “men’s rights activists” they’re “anti women activists”. point blank.

finally feminism is not about women being better than men nor is it about being equal to men. feminism is about women being liberated from men. i have no desire to be considered “equal” to the system of power that allows men to abuse, murder, and rape us. i want liberation from patriarchy and men.

July 2014
03
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foxtrotsky:

What men don’t understand is that women are FIERCELY PROTECTIVE of underage girls because we remember when we were young and some adult man made us uncomfortable or manipulated us or was inappropriate with us and we were powerless.

July 2014
02
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pizzagrrrl:

Peggielene Bartels, A.K.A. King Peggy, is currently the King of Otuam, Ghana. She was chosen to be one of only three female kings in Ghana, and when she discovered that male chauvinists wanted her to only be a figurehead, she said: “They were treating me like I am a second-class citizen because I am a woman. I said, ‘Hell no, you’re not going to do this to a woman!’” When she encountered corruption and the threat of embezzlement to the royal funds, she declared “I’m going to squeeze their balls so hard their eyes pop!”
King Peggy has maintained her work in Ghana’s embassy in Washington, D.C. while making education affordable in Otuam, installing borehead wells to produce clean drinking water, enforcing incarceration laws to deal with domestic violence, replenishing the royal coffers by taxing Otuam’s fishing industry to improve life in the village, and appointing three women to her council.
“Nobody should tell you, ‘You’re a woman, you can’t do it,’” she insists. “You can do it. Be ready to accept it when the calling comes.”
Quoted from the Spring/Summer 2012 issue of Ms. Magazine.

pizzagrrrl:

Peggielene Bartels, A.K.A. King Peggy, is currently the King of Otuam, Ghana. She was chosen to be one of only three female kings in Ghana, and when she discovered that male chauvinists wanted her to only be a figurehead, she said: “They were treating me like I am a second-class citizen because I am a woman. I said, ‘Hell no, you’re not going to do this to a woman!’” When she encountered corruption and the threat of embezzlement to the royal funds, she declared “I’m going to squeeze their balls so hard their eyes pop!”

King Peggy has maintained her work in Ghana’s embassy in Washington, D.C. while making education affordable in Otuam, installing borehead wells to produce clean drinking water, enforcing incarceration laws to deal with domestic violence, replenishing the royal coffers by taxing Otuam’s fishing industry to improve life in the village, and appointing three women to her council.

“Nobody should tell you, ‘You’re a woman, you can’t do it,’” she insists. “You can do it. Be ready to accept it when the calling comes.”

Quoted from the Spring/Summer 2012 issue of Ms. Magazine.