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July 2014
29
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  • Guy: What do girls do at sleepovers?
  • Me: Pass the Bechdel test.
#heh   #feminism   
July 2014
26
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"My response to the “I am not a feminist” internet phenomenon….

First of all, it’s clear you don’t know what feminism is. But I’m not going to explain it to you. You can google it. To quote an old friend, “I’m not the feminist babysitter.”

But here is what I think you should know.

You’re insulting every woman who was forcibly restrained in a jail cell with a feeding tube down her throat for your right to vote, less than 100 years ago.

You’re degrading every woman who has accessed a rape crisis center, which wouldn’t exist without the feminist movement.

You’re undermining every woman who fought to make marital rape a crime (it was legal until 1993).

You’re spitting on the legacy of every woman who fought for women to be allowed to own property (1848). For the abolition of slavery and the rise of the labor union. For the right to divorce. For women to be allowed to have access to birth control (Comstock laws). For middle and upper class women to be allowed to work outside the home (poor women have always worked outside the home). To make domestic violence a crime in the US (It is very much legal in many parts of the world). To make workplace sexual harassment a crime.

In short, you know not what you speak of. You reap the rewards of these women’s sacrifices every day of your life. When you grin with your cutsey sign about how you’re not a feminist, you ignorantly spit on the sacred struggle of the past 200 years. You bite the hand that has fed you freedom, safety, and a voice.

In short, kiss my ass, you ignorant little jerks.”

 -

Libby Anne (via newwavenova)

You can thank feminists for your right to express your ignorant, trite opinions on the internet, too, anti-feminist women.  Give feminists a round of applause because now you can spew your thoughtlessness wherever you want. Freely.

July 2014
26
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itscalledfashionlookitup:

When people compare the greatness that is The Simpsons to other animated shows like Family Guy it makes me want to set myself on fire

July 2014
25
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Comic-Con 2014: Outcry, action against harassment grows 

July 2014
24
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tedx:

Watch the whole talk here »

Leslie Morgan Steiner was in an abusive relationship, though at first she didn’t realize it. In a talk at TEDxRainier, she tells the disturbing story of her relationship, correcting misconceptions many people hold about victims of domestic violence, and explaining how we can all help break the silence.

If you or someone you know is facing domestic violence or an absuive relationship, you can find a list of resources here. The U.S. National Sexual Assault Hotline is 1-800-656-4673 (HOPE), and RAINN offers a secure online hotline.

July 2014
24
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Q: Girls are discouraged? That sounds so 1970s.

A: There was a 2001 study that showed in fourth grade, 68% of boys and 66% of girls like science. Starting in sixth, seventh and eighth grade, we lose girls and boys, but we lose more girls and for different reasons: lingering stereotypes, societal pressures. It’s well known that many girls have a tendency to dumb down when they’re in middle school. Just last week, I was talking to senior executives, and a woman told me that she was the best biology student in high school and had the highest exam scores. At the end of the semester, a teacher told her: “I’m sorry, but I’m going to have to give the award in biology to a boy, because it’s more important to him.” Almost every time that I give a speech or meet with a group of women, I’ll hear such stories.

Q: Boys earn 70% of the D’s and F’s in school and account for 80% of dropouts. Shouldn’t we fear more for their future?

A: It’s a big problem. Women earn the majority of undergraduate degrees in the U.S. and last year earned more Ph.D.s than men. But keeping girls in the science and math pipeline is a separate problem with different causes. It’s important we address both. You don’t stop research on breast cancer just because heart disease is also deadly. You work on both.

Q: Suppose you were an executive of a corporation that needs engineers. You meet a girl in high school. She scored in the 99th percentile in math on her SATs, yet says she wants to major in psychology or go to law school, because those careers sound more interesting. What do you tell her?

A: I’d introduce her to the coolest female engineer in the company. Girls tend to have a stereotype of engineers being 65-year-old guys who wear lab coats and pocket protectors and look like Einstein. Try to make it personal to them and show them some of the cool things that they can do in engineering.

Q: Let’s talk Lawrence Summers. The Harvard president recently resigned after giving a controversial speech a year ago suggesting that men might simply be predisposed to be better at math and science. Is there at least a grain of truth in what he said?

A: (Laughs). Suppose you came across a woman lying on the street with an elephant sitting on her chest. You notice she is short of breath. Shortness of breath can be a symptom of heart problems. In her case, the much more likely cause is the elephant on her chest.

For a long time, society put obstacles in the way of women who wanted to enter the sciences. That is the elephant. Until the playing field has been leveled and lingering stereotypes are gone, you can’t even ask the question.

Q: I will anyway. There are many obvious biological differences between men and women. This can’t be one?

A: There are obvious differences, but until you eliminate the more obvious cause, it’s difficult to get at the question scientifically. Look at law, medicine and business. In 1970 — that’s not ancient history — law school was 5% female, med school was 8% and business school was 4%. You could have taken a look at those numbers and concluded that women don’t make good lawyers or doctors. The statistics might have supported you. But today, all of those fields are about 50-50.

 - Sally Ride (the first American woman in space) giving awesome answers to insipid questions in this interview.  (via itsawomansworld2)
July 2014
23
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When I attended CatalystCon this spring, I received a lot of advice from older female sex writers, many of whom encouraged me to be careful as I started my career. I was just too young to understand the ramifications of my decisions, one woman in her early 50s stressed. I did not want to brand myself with a scarlet letter this early in the game. Her advice, while well intentioned, scared the shit out of me. But then I actually thought about the undercurrent of what she had said. It was a maternally protective gesture marked by fear: others will judge you for writing what you write, and you need to anticipate that.


Well I don’t want to anticipate that. I don’t want to accommodate a culture that will slut-shame me for writing thought-provoking, eloquent, and yes, sexy fiction and nonfiction. If my solid resume of clips and internships with gender and sexuality oriented publishing houses means I will not get a job I am fully qualified for in the future, fuck that.One of the central reasons I write feminist erotica is to change the culture, not to jack it off while comfortably existing within its patriarchal hang ups.

July 2014
19
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  • Glamour UK: What do you get riled up about in a feminist context?
  • Gillian Anderson: A lot. I have feminist bones and when I hear things or see people react to women in certain ways I have very little tolerance.
  • Glamour UK: But don't you feel sorry for modern men? Not knowing whether they should help us with our bags and open doors for us or whether we'll see it as an affront?
  • Gillian Anderson: No. I don't feel sorry for men.
#feminism   
July 2014
18
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princelesscomic:

*Zuri and I listen to the radio*
Zuri - Did you hear daddy? They said equal rights for women.
Me - I did hear that.
Zuri - I’m a woman.
Me - Yes you are. Do you want equal rights?
Zuri - Yep.
Me - Then you’re a feminist.
Zuri - I’m a feminist! I will tell mommy when we get home.
Me - I think she’ll be happy to hear that.

Gotta teach your kids the “F” word young, before they learn it from somebody that doesn’t know how to use it.

#feminism   
July 2014
15
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It is illegal for women to go topless in most cities, yet you can buy a magazine of a woman without her top on at any 7-11 store. So, you can sell breasts, but you cannot wear breasts, in America.

 -

Violet Rose (via c-icatrix)

This is one of my favorite quotes about sexualization/objectification vs autonomy of female bodies bc it’s so succinct

(via platonicsbeforeerotics)

July 2014
14
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There was some controversy about our outfits and how we were dressed and stuff on the Boss music video, which…I don’t know, I think part of the whole—part of the whole stand that we’re making with this thing that we’re calling women empowerment is the fact that, you know, this society has a lot to say on what makes a woman—what should make a woman feel good, and what doesn’t look good, and what does look good, and…they think that they have a right to tell us as women what should make us feel confident in our own bodies. And whether that is, you know, being covered up and wearing a long sleeve sweater, or showing a body part that maybe you would like to show off, at the end of the day, we’re the only ones that are entitled to our bodies, and you’re allowed to wear whatever makes you feel good and whatever makes you feel confident. And that made us feel confident in the video. We’re not encouraging for anyone to dress like that or to dress in a certain way, we’re encouraging all women to dress how they would like to dress and how they would like in order to feel confident and in order to feel good, because at the end of the day we’re the only ones that should be making that call. And whether or not somebody sexualizes you for wearing an outfit, that’s their problem and not yours, I think. And, yeah, I think there’s this whole movement dedicated to that now: the feminist movement of women wearing what they want to wear for them and not for anybody else. And whatever your judgment is on that, it’s not up to you. Girls, we gotta stand firm on that. So, I don’t know, that’s just—that’s what we believe.

 - Camila Cabello, proving at 17 years old she’s more aware than the majority of people with decades on her [x] (via 5horbust)
July 2014
14
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electrikmoonlight:the-privateer:wackiness-ensues:

#YESALLWOMEN

wasn’t this the episode where he dressed up as a woman on a bet because he thought women were overreacting?

This show was progressive beyond it’s years

July 2014
12
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dinotrash:

it is really telling that when guys find out that a lot of women have sexual assault/rape experiences they think that the majority of them are LYING rather than thinking oh this is a huge issue that effects a large portion of women and makes a large group of men predators whoa

July 2014
10
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#feminism   #rape culture   #fire tw   #alcohol tw   #food tw   #nsfr   
July 2014
10
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whoneedsfeminism:

I need feminism because “Who hired a stripper” shouldn’t be the first thing said to me when I walk into a welding job.

whoneedsfeminism:

I need feminism because “Who hired a stripper” shouldn’t be the first thing said to me when I walk into a welding job.

#feminism