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August 2014
21
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There are some themes, some subjects, too large for adult fiction; they can only be dealt with adequately in a children’s book.

The reason for that is that in adult literary fiction, stories are there on sufferance. Other things are felt to be more important: technique, style, literary knowingness. Adult writers who deal in straightforward stories find themselves sidelined into a genre such as crime or science fiction, where no one expects literary craftsmanship.

But stories are vital. Stories never fail us because, as Isaac Bashevis Singer says, “events never grow stale.” There’s more wisdom in a story than in volumes of philosophy. And by a story I mean not only Little Red Riding Hood and Cinderella and Jack and the Beanstalk but also the great novels of the nineteenth century, Jane Eyre, Middlemarch, Bleak House and many others: novels where the story is at the center of the writer’s attention, where the plot actually matters. The present-day would-be George Eliots take up their stories as if with a pair of tongs. They’re embarrassed by them. If they could write novels without stories in them, they would. Sometimes they do.

But what characterizes the best of children’s authors is that they’re not embarrassed to tell stories. They know how important stories are, and they know, too, that if you start telling a story you’ve got to carry on till you get to the end. And you can’t provide two ends, either, and invite the reader to choose between them. Or as in a highly praised recent adult novel I’m about to stop reading, three different beginnings. In a book for children you can’t put the plot on hold while you cut artistic capers for the amusement of your sophisticated readers, because, thank God, your readers are not sophisticated. They’ve got more important things in mind than your dazzling skill with wordplay. They want to know what happens next.

 -

Philip Pullman, born October 19, 1946 (via annaverity)

Exceedingly apropos of my last reblog, and also just some Basic Truth.

(via sarahreesbrennan)

#books   #kidlit   #hamline mfac   #writing   #mg lit   #ya lit   
August 2014
20
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#heh   #kidlit   #mg lit   #books   
August 2014
18
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bibliolectors:

Let’s read! / Leemos (ilustración de Kirstie Belle)

bibliolectors:

Let’s read! / Leemos (ilustración de Kirstie Belle)

#books   #art   
August 2014
13
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hollyblack:

ivegotthekittens:

malindalo:

From today on Twitter: I often see “I wish [bestselling writer] would include POC/LGBT characters!” But There are other writers who do this. Support them.

So, you’re suggesting I read books by authors I do not like, and/or that deals with subjects I am not interested in, simply because it has a PoC/LGBT character? 
I wish certain authors would have diverse characters because these are the ones writing books I’m actually going to read. 
And I wish bestselling artists would because no matter what their next book going to be about, it would get many readers and a lot of publicity. 
Can you imagine what it would have been like for PoC and LGBT to have their group represented as one of the trio in Harry Potter? Or even just make Dumbledore openly and obviously gay? 
This is what we need. It’s not that the public isn’t aware such people exists, but they are never in the mainstream media. Correct me if I’m wrong, but seems to me this is what all those PoC justice posts are preaching. 
And best selling authors are the main streams of books, so we want them to include these characters. 

Seriously? Do you honestly believe that bestselling books are anointed and raised up by some divine hand? Like THE CLAW HAS CHOSEN? And for some reason the claw keeps choosing straight white cisgender protagonists written by straight white cisgender authors? REALLY?
Best selling authors don’t just HAPPEN to be in the mainstream media. Selling a lot of books MAKES someone a bestselling author and GETS mainstream media attention. But books are sold one at a time to readers who make choices about which books they want to support.
If you want more diversity, you have to buy more diversely.
And, look, I love me and I want everyone to read all my books all the time, but reading a book with a diverse cast written by JK Rowling or myself or any other white straight cisgender writer isn’t the same as reading a book written by a person of color or a LGBTQ+ writer. It’s the difference between a secondary source and a primary source. But if you feel that FOR SOME REASON you can be absolutely sure that you’re not going to like a book you haven’t read because it isn’t already a bestseller, then I guess that’s you, but please, please, please don’t act like it’s some kind of positive political act.
And don’t you dare talk that way to Malinda.
 #yes all of this#bc yes it would have been AMAZING to have diversity in HP or any other huge bestseller#(or you know had the POC main characters of a series not been erased by the films#but that is another argument entirely)#but books become bestsellers when you buy them#movies become successful when you see them#you can’t just hope things happen in already mainstream things#you have to support new things#you have to create a new mainstream#and okay#if you do not read/purchase diverse books#if those books by and/or about diverse characters do not get bought#then what is the incentive for already mainstream writers to include those characters?#they are already writing bestsellers right?#they are not including diversity and their book sales are telling them they do not have to#they might even be suggesting that is BETTER for them not to#because publishing is an industry#and if diverse books are consumed and make money#that is in the long run going to be more convincing that more of them should be published#also i’m not sure how you know you like an author if you have not tried to read them#but (via mightfindmevaluable)

hollyblack:

ivegotthekittens:

malindalo:

From today on Twitter: I often see “I wish [bestselling writer] would include POC/LGBT characters!” But There are other writers who do this. Support them.

So, you’re suggesting I read books by authors I do not like, and/or that deals with subjects I am not interested in, simply because it has a PoC/LGBT character? 

I wish certain authors would have diverse characters because these are the ones writing books I’m actually going to read. 

And I wish bestselling artists would because no matter what their next book going to be about, it would get many readers and a lot of publicity. 

Can you imagine what it would have been like for PoC and LGBT to have their group represented as one of the trio in Harry Potter? Or even just make Dumbledore openly and obviously gay? 

This is what we need. It’s not that the public isn’t aware such people exists, but they are never in the mainstream media. Correct me if I’m wrong, but seems to me this is what all those PoC justice posts are preaching. 

And best selling authors are the main streams of books, so we want them to include these characters. 

Seriously? Do you honestly believe that bestselling books are anointed and raised up by some divine hand? Like THE CLAW HAS CHOSEN? And for some reason the claw keeps choosing straight white cisgender protagonists written by straight white cisgender authors? REALLY?

Best selling authors don’t just HAPPEN to be in the mainstream media. Selling a lot of books MAKES someone a bestselling author and GETS mainstream media attention. But books are sold one at a time to readers who make choices about which books they want to support.

If you want more diversity, you have to buy more diversely.

And, look, I love me and I want everyone to read all my books all the time, but reading a book with a diverse cast written by JK Rowling or myself or any other white straight cisgender writer isn’t the same as reading a book written by a person of color or a LGBTQ+ writer. It’s the difference between a secondary source and a primary source. But if you feel that FOR SOME REASON you can be absolutely sure that you’re not going to like a book you haven’t read because it isn’t already a bestseller, then I guess that’s you, but please, please, please don’t act like it’s some kind of positive political act.

And don’t you dare talk that way to Malinda.

  (via mightfindmevaluable)

August 2014
08
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Part of Florian Beaudenon's Instant Life series.

#books   
August 2014
08
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monumentoursetlist asked

I work at my university's bookstore and every semester one of the professors teaches 'Fight Club' and it's so exciting to see boxes of it come in and rather disappointed to see people return their rented copied or sell them back. Once I returned a copy and the student wrote the synopsis of each chapter under the heading and I freaked out. My manager said it was in otherwise fine condition so we couldn't charge her but what spoilers. How do you feel about your work being taught ?

dashconballpit:

chuckpalahniuk:

That fact that ‘Fight Club’ is being taught seems — to me — to underscore the dearth of novels that explore male issues.  The past years have given us so many books, from ‘The Color Purple’ to ‘The Joy Luck Club’ to ‘How to Make an American Quilt,’ which depict women in groups and relationship, but almost no books depicting social models for men.  That’s my two cents worth.

image

August 2014
07
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bookmad:aperfectbookshelf:


Look at my cute new pin!! :D

*grabby hands*

bookmad:aperfectbookshelf:

Look at my cute new pin!! :D

*grabby hands*

August 2014
03

Book Meme I - tagged by thicccc

I was tagged by thicccc!

Rules: In a text post, list ten books that have stayed with you in some way. Don’t take but a few minutes, and don’t think too hard — they don’t have to be the “right” or “great” works, just the ones that have touched you. Tag [ten] friends, including me, so I’ll see your list. Make sure you let your friends know you’ve tagged them.

  1. Bread and Jam for Frances, Russell Hoban. This was my first-ever favorite book. My dad made me a bootleg cassette tape of it on his 8-track dubbing machine, but the tape skipped, so one of the sentences repeats 40x in a row. I always listened to it all the way through every time so I wouldn’t miss anything that came next.
  2. Ghosts Don’t Eat Potato Chips, Debbie Dadey & Marcia Thornton Jones. There was an independent children’s bookstore in my hometown when I was growing up which hosted monthly book signing events.  And I went to all of them.  Debbie Dadey and Marcia Thornton-Jones, the co-authors of The Adventures of the Bailey School Kids series—one of my favorites—ran theirs differently than any other writers I met: rather than signing our books, they asked all of us kids to sit at a little table and write, then autograph, a book for them.  They said that they had faith that any of us who wanted to become writers could.  That blew my mind.
  3. Meet Samantha, Susan S. Adler. I double-majored in history and creative writing, and it’s like 98% due to the American Girls.  Women and girls made at least half of all history and never get credit for it.  I plan to help change that.
  4. Are You There, God? It’s Me, Margaret, Judy Blume.  This was the first, and to date only, book I’ve ever read that had a main character whose family background was in ANY way similar to mine, and that was groundbreaking for me.  Also Margaret was totally a baby gay, looking back at it now, and I identified with that, too.
  5. Bat 6, Virginia Euwer Wolff. I read this during the requisite period of “it’s sixth grade and the only thing we learn about is WWII so by default all eleven-year-olds are obsessed with WWII.”  I wrote a scathing letter to the school board, asking why we weren’t taught about the Japanese internment camps and war crimes committed by America.  They were not pleased with me.
  6. The Princess Diaries, Meg Cabot. “Judith Gershner, like Michael, is a genius. Judith, like Michael, got into Columbia, early-decision. Judith, like Michael, got a blue ribbon at the annual Albert Einstein High School Biomedical Technology Fair, for her project, in which she cloned a fruitfly. SHE CLONED A FRUITFLY. AT HOME. IN HER BEDROOM. Gee, if you were Michael, who would you date? The girl who can clone things in her room? Or the 5’9” princess who bit her own tongue?”
  7. LOVE & Other Four-Letter Words, Carolyn Mackler. This was the first even semi-sexual (in a non-puberty-related way) book that I ever read, and that sort of blew my mind, too.  The idea that sexuality was a part of actual life, instead of totally separate from “real life” was so alien.
  8. The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks, e.lockhart. If this book had existed when I was a teenager, my entire life would have turned out differently.
  9. The Hunger Games, Suzanne Collins. I owe the entirety of my last four years to this book.
  10. REPLICA series, Marilyn Kaye. 1) This series is 400% just Orphan Black, written 15 years before OB came out, and starring an eighth grader. 2) This was the first scifi series I’d found that starred a girl as the powerful character without taking away her relatability as an eighth grade girl. 3) I had a huge crush on the clones.

I tag: sounds-simple-right reachmouse heyspibsy laserskellernoises percyjacksons callistana phrasesandmeter glycerineclown ashalee stelmarias

And this is Part I because I was also tagged by Emma povverbottoms, and I’ll do that one later.

August 2014
02
The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place: Children raised by wolves, a brave orphan governess, racing ostriches, a pet squirrel, the Wreck of Hesperus, and a mysterious howling…

8tracks || download

1. The Dog Days Are Over - Florence + the Machine 2. Kids - Brian Reitzell 3. Stray Dog - Robert Pattinson 4. The Wolf - Fever Ray 5. Diamond Dogs - Beck 6. Up with the Birds - Coldplay 7. Bird of the Summer - A Fine Frenzy 8. The Wolf - Eddie Vedder

The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place: Children raised by wolves, a brave orphan governess, racing ostriches, a pet squirrel, the Wreck of Hesperus, and a mysterious howling…

8tracks || download

1. The Dog Days Are Over - Florence + the Machine 2. Kids - Brian Reitzell 3. Stray Dog - Robert Pattinson 4. The Wolf - Fever Ray 5. Diamond Dogs - Beck 6. Up with the Birds - Coldplay 7. Bird of the Summer - A Fine Frenzy 8. The Wolf - Eddie Vedder

August 2014
01
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decaturpubliclibrary:

Well Read Octopus by Rebecca Flaum found on inprnt.com

decaturpubliclibrary:

Well Read Octopus by Rebecca Flaum found on inprnt.com

#cephalopods   #books   #tea   #nsfr   #it me   
July 2014
30
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mishawinsexster:

Book Cover Tropes

#ya lit   #books   
July 2014
29
  • ThinkProgress: So what do you think the priority needs to be: do we focus all our energy on ending illiteracy, or do we focus on fostering a love of reading in kids?
  • LeVar Burton: I wish I knew. What I do know is that a sustainable society needs both. You need to teach your children how to read, and you need for them to love to read. If you want free, independent thinkers, people who can discern for themselves, people who want to actively participate in a democracy, you want them literate. If you want to control people, if you want to feed them a pack of lies and dominate them, keep them ignorant. For me, literacy means freedom. For the individual and for society.
July 2014
25
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linksoflondonbracelets:

owlish bookish tea-ish.

linksoflondonbracelets:

owlish bookish tea-ish.

#books   #owls   #tea   #art   #nsfr   
July 2014
24
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duttonbooks:

bibliolectors: In the heat of the books (illustration by Paul Thurlby)

duttonbooks:

bibliolectorsIn the heat of the books (illustration by Paul Thurlby)

#books   #animals   #penguins   #art